Mycorrhiza to the rescue

Hi Tom, Will the below be of use? Rupert The FAO have stated that there are some 60 harvests left if soils are degraded at the current rate. To put this into figures, land area equating to a country the size of Syria is lost to cultivation every year by becoming exhausted, contaminated or desertified. Recent research has shown that this disordered state can be reversed. Such processes that are involved may be unsuitable for the climatic desert but eminently suited to the overcultivated and otherwise marginalised soils on the edge of the great deserts. The technology harnesses mycorrhiza, a number of strains of...

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A better thought out reply than the Sainsbury one at least.

Dear Jane I admire the intellectual dexterity of your reply but I don’t think it answers my complaints. You omit to mention that paper bags can also be recycled and whereas plastic can usually be recycled no more than twice paper can be recycled ad infinitum.  And are you really expecting me to believe that it’s going to need a fleet of the huge Tesco lorries we see on the roads to carry the excess weight of paper bags?  That’s ridiculous.  But there’s really a more important point.  Yes the environmental problems can all be solved but they won’t...

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Not actually going to do anything about it then

Dear Thomas Thanks for your email.  We share your concerns about the effects of carrier bags on the environment and, for a number of years, have been focusing on reducing, reusing and recycling plastic bags in all our stores. We know plastic bags are a concern for many people and our customers, colleagues and stakeholders often tell us they'd like us to do more to reduce the number they use.  We believe that encouraging customers to change their behaviour is the best way to reduce the numbers of bags used and we've done this by replacing our single-use orange carrier bags in-store with...

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The world is losing the battle against climate change

The world is losing the battle against climate change. According to Climate Action Tracker not a single major industrial nation is on course to keep to the agreement they made in 2015 in Paris. 2017 was the worst year yet for atmospheric pollution. Since Trump there has been a huge surge in investments in fossil fuels. If you don't want your children to inherit, according to the now virtually unanimous opinion of the climate scientists, a truly truly terrible world, get up and do something. We maybe in practice have twenty years to reverse this descent into a horrific...

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Fossil fuel investments have soared under Trump

Bank holdings in “extreme” fossil fuels skyrocketed globally to $115bn during Donald Trump’s first year as US president, with holdings in tar sands oil more than doubling, a new report has found. A sharp flight from fossil fuels investments after the Paris agreement was reversed last year with a return to energy sources dubbed “extreme” because of their contribution to global emissions. This included an 11% hike in funding for carbon-heavy tar sands, as well as Arctic and ultra-deepwater oil and coal. US and Canadian banks led a race back into the unconventional energy sector following Trump’s promise to withdraw from...

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Completely Beyond Belief

The Australian cricket scandal? 'Completely beyond belief' said the Australian Prime Minister. The extreme threat climate change presents according to the scientists? Completely beyond belief too it seems.

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Looking for a Father (2)

Looking for a Father (2)   The infant is saved from Winnicott’s dreadful terrors of disintegration and total annihilation of his tiny being by the equally all-encompassing and total love of “the good enough mother”.  But there is a price to be paid.  How, when he gets to the stage of desiring independence, can he escape from this encircling totality of maternal love?  The dilemma is often worse.  Another of my favourite authors is the French psycho-analyst Christiane Olivier.  Her theme is that women desire to be loved by men but all too often their proffered love is not returned.    In...

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Looking for a Father (i)

Admittedly at first sight this post doesn't seem to have much to do with climate,  but there are five parts and it will get there. One of my favourite authors is Christopher Bollas, a member of the British school of psycho-analysis whose inspirational founder was D.W. Winnicott.  Winnicott’s great insight was that human infants are born extremely prematurely (on brain size we should be born at twenty-one months like the elephant) and, because of that, to begin with the infant is physically separate from his/her mother but psychologically not separate from her and still part of her.  “The child” Susie...

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